Core Analysis

Understanding the Earth's past requires detailed geochemical analysis This means understanding not only the compositional materials like SiO2 and CaCO3, but also trace elements like Mo and U which can indicate the reduction sequence in marine environments.

At PRI, we use an in-line XRF system to do continues step analysis of cores, enabling us to process data rapidly and accurate. We follow the methods and employ the standards used in Rowe et al. 2012. With a full range of elements, complex paleoclimatic interpretation is possible, which relevance to reconstructing geochemical formation processes.


Pasted Graphic


At PRI, we use an in-line XRF system to do continues step analysis of cores, enabling us to process data rapidly and accurate. We follow the methods and employ the standards used in Rowe et al. 2012. With a full range of elements, complex paleoclimatic interpretation is possible, which relevance to reconstructing geochemical formation processes.

In this example, a calcium carbonate (Ca~30%) predominates, formed largely by the precipitation of dead plankton on the sea floor. In an ocean with plenty of oxygen, the carbon is recycled to the biosphere via the activity of bacteria; with only remnants of being the shells of the microscopic organisms. However, to the right of the graph, the calcium concentration drops while a trace metal, molybedenum (Mo) increases. Key to understanding this change is knowing that Mo oxide is soluble in water while Mo sulfide is not. In anoxic conditions, the Mo will precipitate out. These same anoxic conditions also prevent the growth of bacteria, thus in turn keeping the carbon from being recycled to the biosphere. These are ideal conditions for the preservation of organic carbon, and can be used to identify fossil fuel deposits.

By pairing XRF data with targeted XRD and FTIR application, we can provide complete analysis to contextualize findings and help guide decision making.


IMG_3374